Ever fancied a bite to eat after you've taken in a gallery or museum? Visitors to some of the world's greatest art spaces no longer have to make do with an over priced croissant, as FOUR discovers five of the world’s best restaurants within galleries and museums

Le Café Marly, Louvre, Paris

Le Café Marly is located in the famous Louvre in Paris. Sitting on the terrace, guests face the Louvre pyramid over lunch, afternoon tea or dinner. Chef Georges Dos Santos serves classic à la carte dishes, including the filet château béarnaise and grilled turbot.

The third largest and most visited museum in the world, the Louvre is well known for its Greek and Roman antique collections, but also for the Italian Renaissance and French painting from 15th - 19th centuries, although, arguably, its most famous piece is the Mona Lisa by Leonardo da Vinci.

www.maisonthierrycostes.com

Portrait Restaurant, National Portrait Gallery, London

An amazing view is guaranteed when dining at the Portrait Restaurant in London, 92ft above ground level, with Big Ben, London Eye and the Houses of Parliament in view. Katarina Todosijevic, the Swedish born chef, creates a British menu, which complements the nature of the gallery, with dishes such as wild mushroom and truffle cream pastry cup and Monmouthshire farm air-dried beef.

The Searcy’s restaurant is a welcome addition to the National Portrait Gallery, where visitors can gaze at artwork of historically important figures. Housing more portraiture than any other gallery in the world, the gallery is also one of the oldest, having opened in 1856. 

www.searcys.co.uk

Terzo Piano, Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago

Fresh, local and sustainably produced ingredients – that’s a promise made at the Terzo Piano by head chef Megan Neubeck, who recently took over the post of chef di cucina at the Art Institute of Chicago. The seasonal and elegant dishes are complemented by an artisan cheese list, which includes the finest American cheeses.

The restaurant is located in the Art Institute of Chicago, founded in 1866. Walt Disney once used to study at the museum, which holds around 300,000 pieces from spanning 5,000 years.

The Wallace Restaurant, The Wallace Collection, London

Classic French dishes in a London museum? It’s made possible at The Wallace Restaurant in Marylebone. Utilising the best British and French ingredients head chef Ivan Simeoli creates a great menu. The Wallace Restaurant opens daily for breakfast, lunch and afternoon tea, while Friday and Saturday evening offer a dinner menu, too.

The restaurant fits perfectly in The Wallace Collection, which is settled in a historic town house at Manchester Square. It presents art from the 15th to the 19th century. But especially the amount of French paintings, furniture and porcelain from 18th century is worth to see.

Combal.Zero, Castello di Rivoli Museum of Contemporary Art, near Turin

Davide Scabin, chef of the Combal.Zero, is known as forerunner of the modern ‘Art & Food Design’. He’s experimenting steadily with ingredients, shapes, textures and temperatures, using design-orientated techniques. This brilliant use of ingredients has led to two-Michelin-stars for Combal.Zero.

The restaurant is part of the Castello di Rivoli Museum of Contemporary Art near Turin. The museum, located in a baroque castle style building, showcases a collection of contemporary artworks from 1950s to the present day, in addition to rotating exhibitions.

The Wallace Restaurant, The Wallace Collection, London

Classic French dishes in a London museum? It’s made possible at The Wallace Restaurant in Marylebone. Utilising the best British and French ingredients head chef Ivan Simeoli creates a great menu. The Wallace Restaurant opens daily for breakfast, lunch and afternoon tea, while Friday and Saturday evening offer a dinner menu, too.

The restaurant fits perfectly in The Wallace Collection, which is settled in a historic town house at Manchester Square. It presents art from the 15th to the 19th century. But especially the amount of French paintings, furniture and porcelain from 18th century is worth to see.

Combal.Zero, Castello di Rivoli Museum of Contemporary Art, near Turin

Davide Scabin, chef of the Combal.Zero, is known as forerunner of the modern ‘Art & Food Design’. He’s experimenting steadily with ingredients, shapes, textures and temperatures, using design-orientated techniques. This brilliant use of ingredients has led to two-Michelin-stars for Combal.Zero.

The restaurant is part of the Castello di Rivoli Museum of Contemporary Art near Turin. The museum, located in a baroque castle style building, showcases a collection of contemporary artworks from 1950s to the present day, in addition to rotating exhibitions.