"Horsemeat is actually quite nice," were the words that we heard master chef Simon Rogan utter last week when we quizzed him on the latest from the horsemeat scandal. As a child, Simon says he happily ate horsemeat when he would stay with a family in France every summer where horsemeat is often on the menu. For some, this idyllic story is very far from their own experience with horsemeat since news and uproar of it being sold in supermarkets across Britain labelled as something else broke out not long ago. Like most of us, Simon strongly agrees that serving up wrongly labelled meat is far from acceptable. Yet he wasted no time telling us that he was very keen on the idea of introducing horsemeat - all legit of course - to the British palate. And if Simon Rogan of Michelin-starred restaurant L'Enclume thinks so, then so do we...

"As long as the horses are kept in good condition as prime cows are, I don't see a problem with eating the meat," says Simon who's just one of the chefs we've recently come across 'bucking' the idea of bringing horsemeat to the Isles. At the beginning of March Irish chef Oliver Peyton of the National Gallery’s National Dining Rooms hosted an evening which aimed to showcase horsemeat on a menu, created along with National Galley’s chef Gillan Kingstree, which included horse tartare and horse sirloin, both pictured left. On 12 March TimeOut London unveiled that restaurant Flogging a Dead Horse has been serving horsemeat at their pop-dining nights in secret locations across London for over 18 months, too.

This recent trend in chefs and restaurants in the UK giving the ‘OK’ to horsemeat has come as somewhat of a surprise when in only 2007, chef Gordon Ramsay was targeted by animal rights groups after he and Janet Street-Porter, then contestant on Ramsay’s show The F-Word, suggested people in the UK should be eating more of it. After Street-Porter was seen at Cheltenham during Gold Cup week offering passers-by samples, protesters fought back by dumping a truck of manure outside chef Ramsay’s restaurant at Claridges.

As chef Rogan points out, elsewhere in the world, particularly in France, eating horsemeat is less of a trend and more a part of the culinary culture. At Les Tontons restaurant, opposite the former Paris horse abattoir, where you can be served horse tartare, owner Jean-Guillaume Dufour says: “Of course, it is perfectly apt because the original steak tartare was horse. The Mongol tribesmen ate their own horses and tenderised the steak under their saddles.”

So, is the question less about whether we should be eating horsemeat and more who is eating horsemeat and is the trend here to stay? Let us know your thoughts...