The simple KitchenAid is a delight to any culinary enthusiast, but with the launch of their new glass bowl mixer and a new array of colours, your mum’s going to be launching herself into the kitchen in no time. The proof is in the pudding…


The KitchenAids

The Glass Bowl of Wonder

Bigger, better and stronger, the 6.0L Glass Bowl-lift Stand Mixer is a culinary design-feat. It can mix dough for more than 8 loaves of bread, while not splattering its ingredients everywhere and looking unbelievably slick at the same time (even we can’t do it). This new model also has an option for more than a dozen accessories, turning it into a juicer, coffee grinder, cooking bowl and dicer. It’s basically everything you’ve ever needed in a kitchen!

Available in Empire Red and Almond Cream; from €999


A Colour-nary Delight

Two new earth-inspired 4.8L Tilt-Head Stand Mixers have been added to KitchenAid’s Artisan collection. Focusing on the traditional and natural side of cooking, the new cast iron and terracotta shades are the hot new kitchen accessories to have.

From €628


Seared Sea Bass with Blood Orange Hollandaise

Hollandaise is, in fact, a hot mayonnaise which is traditionally flavoured with lemon juice. But any citrus fruit will do, such as pink grapefruit or lime.


Serves 4-6

Prepararion 5 minutes

Cook 20 minutes



1 shallot

100 ml freshly squeezed blood orange juice

1 tsp honey (optional)

4 egg yolks

250 g warm melted butter, preferably clarified

a squeeze of lemon juice

4-6 x 150 g sea bass fillets with the skin on

1 tbsp olive oil

1 tbsp butter

salt and freshly ground white pepper



Slice the shallot with the slicing drum on the rotor vegetable slicer/shredder on speed 4. Place in a small saucepan with the blood orange juice and honey if using, bring to the boil and reduce by half. Strain into the mixer bowl. Add the egg yolks and whisk with the wire whisk on speed 8 until frothy. Add the melted butter to the mixer bowl as the motor is running: drop by drop at first, then in a slow drizzle as the hollandaise begins to thicken. Season with salt and pepper, and a squeeze of lemon juice. Cover to keep warm. Season the sea bass fillets on the flesh side only. Heat the olive oil and butter in a non-stick frying pan, then fry the sea bass skin-side down on a high heat until just cooked. Turn over and cook for 15 seconds on the flesh side. Place the sea bass skin-side up on warm plates, season to taste and spoon the hollandaise over and around the fish. Serve with steamed green asparagus or grilled fennel. 


Chocolate Mousse with Lapsang Souchong and Single Malt Whisky

Chocolate mousse comes in a variety of guises: with or without butter, cream or alcohol. In this recipe, I have chosen to complement the dark chocolate flavour with smoky Lapsang Souchong tea and peaty single malt whisky, making for a very grown-up dessert.


Serves 4

Preparation 15 minutes

Chill overnight



150 g dark chocolate (70%)

50 g butter

50 g sugar

½ tbsp Lapsang Souchong tea leaves

3 large eggs

2 tbsp single malt whisky

a pinch of salt

cocoa nibs (coarsely ground cocoa beans), to serve



Grate the chocolate into a heatproof bowl with the coarse shredding drum on the rotor vegetable slicer/shredder on speed 4. Add the butter and melt over a pan of simmering water. Stir until smooth, then set aside. Blitz the sugar and tea in a coffee mill until finely ground. Separate the eggs. Beat the egg yolks, tea sugar and whisky in the mixer bowl with the wire whisk on speed 6 until pale and thick. Gently fold in the melted chocolate. Clean and dry the mixer bowl and wire whisk thoroughly, then whisk the egg whites and salt on speed 8 until stiff. Carefully fold into the chocolate mixture. Spoon into bowls or onto plates and chill overnight; or pour into a large bowl and serve the mousse in the shape of quenelles. Just before serving, sprinkle over the cocoa nibs.



Images: 2009 ©Tony Le Duc for Minestrone